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Q10219 - INFO: SSL Glossary - P

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P

Password
A protected/private character string which is applied to authenticate an identity, which gives secure authentication and secure ssl authentication, sometimes with digital signatures and digital certificates like 128-bit ssl digital certificates. Passwords are for a user's online security or authorization security. Working together are certs and secure email with ssl certificates, all terms related to online security.

PKCS #1
RSA public key cryptography standard which defines method of encrypting and signing data using RSA's public key crypto system. Describes a syntax, identical to the syntax in X.509 and PEM, for RSA public and private keys and three signature algorithms for signing certificates and the like.

PKCS #3
RSA public key cryptography standard which describes a method for implementing Diffie-Hellman key exchange.

PKCS #5
RSA public key cryptography standard which describes a method for encrypting messages with a secret key derived from a password. The method is intended primarily to encrypt private keys when transferring them between systems but can be used to encrypt messages.

PKCS #6
RSA public key cryptography standard which describes a standard syntax for public key certificates beyond the X.509 standard. The syntax is a superset of the X.509 certificate with additional attributes extending the certificate process beyond just the public key to include other information such as electronic mail address.

PKCS #7
RSA public key cryptography standard which describes a standard syntax for data, compatible with PEM, that may be encrypted or signed, such as digital envelopes or digital signatures. Allows other attributes, such as timestamp, to be authenticated along with the message content. The syntax is recursive so that envelopes can be nested, or someone can sign some previously encrypted data.

PKCS #8
RSA public key cryptography standard which describes a syntax for private key information - including a private key and a set of attributes - and a syntax for encrypted private keys. PKCS #5 can be used to encrypt the private key information.

PKCS #9
RSA public key cryptography standard which defines selected attribute types for PKCS #6 extended certificates, PKCS #7 digitally signed messages, and PKCS #8 private-key information.

PKCS #10
Public key standard which defines syntax for issuing server certificate requests.

PKCS #11
Public key standard which defines communication methods with cryptographic devices such as smart cards.

PKCS #12
RSA "standard" that describes the syntax for storing in software a user's public keys, protected private keys, certificates, and other related cryptographic information. The goal is to standardize on a single key file for use among a variety of applications.

Protocol
Similar to "protocol" in human communication which involves a previously agreed upon set of rules for communicating in diplomatic settings. On the Internet, a protocol is an agreed upon method for sending and receiving information.

Private Key
The key that a user keeps secret in asymmetric encryption. It can encrypt or decrypt data for a single transaction but cannot do both.

Public Key
The key that a user allows the world to know in asymmetric encryption. It can encrypt or decrypt data for a single transaction but cannot do both.

Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)
PKI is a set of policies, processes, server platforms, software, and workstations used to administer certificates and public-private key pairs, including the ability to issue, maintain, and revoke public key certificates.

Public-Key Cryptography Standards (PKCS)
A series of cryptographic standards dealing with public-key issues, published by RSA Laboratories.

 

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Created on 5/2/2005.
Last Modified on 5/3/2005.
Last Modified by Administrator.
Rated 6 out of 10 based on 3 votes.
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